Is there such a thing as an ugly baby?

A three-minute video featuring a young African American mother lamenting about the fact that her baby boy was in her own words ‘weird looking’ went viral recently.

Screengrab of the viral video in which Quaylaa Ann called her newborn son “weird-looking” (Photo: news.com.au)

She spoke about it being her worst fear realised and that at times she wants to hurt the father of her son as she claims he took his features from him. In the end, she consoled herself with the fact that at least he had a head full of beautiful hair.

For some, the video was funny as she was obviously bothered by the child’s physical features. But most saw it as being disrespectful and hoped that as the child grows she won’t emotionally torture him.

How then is it possible for a mother of all persons to declare her child to be ugly?

The video once again sparked the debate of whether or not there is such a thing as an ugly baby because most of us were raised on the philosophy that babies, puppies, kittens, fairies and unicorns are all cute creations. How then is it possible for a mother of all persons to declare her child to be ugly?

The concept of an ugly baby just seems to be a betrayal of a mother’s love as some argue that the child’s innocence alone makes him or her beautiful and precious in God’s sight.

When in doubt about whether or not a child is ‘unique looking’, observe how onlookers approach them and…their reactions.

So do ugly babies exist? Yes. They do. Being completely honest, some bundles of joy are hard on the eyes. When in doubt about whether or not a child is ‘unique looking’, observe how onlookers approach them and what their reactions are when they see the child’s face.

An ugly baby will get the ‘oh my’ but with a tremble in their voices as if they are hard-pressed to keep looking and would rather turn away. If this has happened in the past, you may have an ugly baby!

The concept of an ugly baby just seems to be a betrayal of a mother’s love.

If you are not the unfortunate parent of a child whose features have gained notoriety but you get approached by someone carrying such a bundle, here is what you do.

Firstly, you control your face and body language, then you focus on the parents and not the child and if they insist on bringing the baby into the conversation, then you try and find something generic to compliment like ‘that’s a cute outfit she has on’ or ‘look at her chubby little legs’ or ‘he is going to be so strong when he grows up”.

And parents of our “unique looking” bundles of joy, be consoled; iconic Jamaican poet and activist, Honourable Louise Bennett-Coverley reminded us “Ugly baby grow pretty…”