Kranium and Notnice share ‘major keys’ to making dancehall ‘nice again’

Billboard-charting producer, Notnice and US-based dancehall artiste, Kranium

Dancehall artiste Kranium has shared his thoughts on what he believes could be key to making dancehall “nice again.”


Taking to Twitter on Wednesday, the ‘Nobody Has To Know’ artiste used social media to highlight that “if this dancehall gonna be nice again, we all gotta voice on any Riddim we like and don’t care whos on it”.


While it is uncertain if Kranium was making reference to any specific situation that went down in the dancehall realms recently, he is almost certain that the way forward for dancehall music involves collaboration especially when it comes onto voicing on a particular rhythm.

“If this dancehall gonna be nice again, we all gotta voice on any Riddim we like and don’t care whos on it”.

Kranium

It is no secret that when it comes to dancehall artistes, unity is often not a strongpoint. In fact, disagreements between artistes have led to some shying away from working with certain producers and fellow artistes.

In an interview with the OBSERVER ONLINE, Billboard-charting producer, Ainsleyy ‘Notnice’ Morris shed light on the latter. The producer who has worked with the likes of Vybz Kartel, Popcaan, Quada, Jahvinci and many others, said artistes have lost their fervency to voice on the same rhythms as other artistes out of fear of a little ‘competition’.

“If yah go voice, just voice no matter the outcome and even if yuh wah know who deh pan di riddim, just ask fi ask sake, don’t make dat decide if yuh voice pan di riddim or not.”

Notnice

“A nuff artiste nuh wah go pan one riddim. Dem wah know who ago deh pan it, dem wah hear di songs dem and dem nuh wah gi dis man or dat man no strength. Is like dem fraid a likkle competition,” he shared.

 “Yuh cant say yah di baddest thing and yuh fraida competition and a feel if dis artiste deh pan di riddim dem might show yuh up. If yah go voice, just voice no matter the outcome and even if yuh wah know who deh pan di riddim, just ask fi ask sake, don’t make dat decide if yuh voice pan di riddim or not.”

He also expressed that the music industry has become too singles-driven highlighting that artistes have lost their fervency to voice on juggling rhythms.

“For dancehall to be great again in my opinion, we need fi start put out more juggling. Majority a di song dem weh out now innu a singles,” he said. “We affi have juggling riddims in dancehall for it to have the impact it used to. When yuh deh party and a juggling riddim play, issa different vibe, a different energy. When different songs a mix in from different artistes a one a di best things innu.”

“Singles needed to but juggling a di thing. A deh so dancehall a come from. Not one-drop and den a next single mix in yah so, and a next single mix in deh so,” he added.

The producer went on to state that he has been trying to get artistes to collaborate on one  rhythm for a number of years but says he’s had no success. He expressed that based on the lack of interest in juggling   rhythms, it’s almost as if entertainers have forgotten its importance. 

“A years mi a try put it together and it nah work.  Di artiste dem nuh deh pan da juggling ting deh. Is like some a dem nuh understand di culture. And some a dem nuh care either,” he said. “Dem nuh see how important juggling riddims are to the industry, the foundation of the music. Some a di biggest dancehall hits come off juggling riddims. Juggling is weh keep the industry going. Most a di dancehall hits weh cross over internationally, come from a juggling.”