Sizzla Kalonji says Rastafarian artists should do more for the religious community

Sizzla Kalonji is calling on his fellow Rastafarian artists to give back to the religion’s places of worship.

The Good Ways singer made the call to action during an Instagram Live on Friday which was intended to promote his newly-released album On a High

“Mi need fi see Buju Banton, Capleton, Bugle, Sizzla, all Jamaican Rastafari artists… When Selassie birthday forward (July 23), yuh supposed to deh inna tabernacle a hail King Selassie once yuh have di locs pon yuh head. Once yuh have the turban pon yuh head, yuh supposed to deh a Bobo Hill a chant. Once yuh have locs or turban yuh supposed to deh a Twelve Tribes, Bobo Hill, Nyahbinghi or Ethiopia World Federation or dung a Ethiopia Orthodox Church. The place inna a bad state.”

Kalonji didn’t exclude himself from the reformation needed but said he’s the only successful Rastafari artist to still attend the sacred spaces. 

“Di Rasta man dem up a Nyahbinghi, a dem alone up deh from before Bob Marley born… All dem can see is Sizzla… A me name Miguel Orlando Collins and from me get the break inna reggae music a up a Bobo Hill mi mek sure deh and dung a Nyahbinghi.”

He encouraged viewers to hold Rastafari artists accountable by encouraging them to observe the Sabbath and other holy days in the religious community. 

“Nuff a we weh a Rasta artist a mek millions of dollars outta Rastafari name and culture…we not going to the tabernacle. We don’t know the reverends.  We don’t know the Ethiopia anthem. We don’t know the Psalms. We don’t know how to hold the banner. You don’t know how to do nothing dung a Nyahbinghi ground. You don’t know how to do nothing dung a Bobo Hill but yaa sing bout pretty girls.”

Kalonji said just as Christians and Muslims invest in their places of worship, the successful Rastafari artists should do the same. 

“It don’t require a lot to fix these places,” he said, listing bathrooms, better roads and fences as immediate needs. He also encouraged his peers to do more for the Haile Selassie High School. 

Until the community unites in this way, Kalonji said the nation will not benefit from their once vibrant title of righteousness holders.

“The reason why the people cya get the protest to deal with Babylon case, we the artists, we’re not united and remember the prophecy seh, ‘singers and players of instruments, my springs are in thee,’ so we the artists need to go before.”