Will the coronavirus spark a baby boom? Maybe not…

With most of the world on lockdown due to coronavirus, people across social media are predicting a baby boom come year-end. As to what this possible generation will be called? You guessed it right (or not): the ‘Coronials’, or as others put it, the ‘Quaranteens’.

The prediction comes days after countries like Jamaica and the United States imposed strict measures to have citizens stay home, as best as possible, to prevent the spread of the COVID-19.

Jamaica’s Prime Minister Andrew Holness this month declared a temporary ban on social gatherings, causing a direct impact on the entertainment industry. There are also restrictions for churches, restaurants, weddings and funerals, as gatherings of more than 20 people are banned, and non-essential workers have been advised to work from home.

“High-mortality events as diverse as famines, earthquakes, heatwaves, and disease all have very predictable effects on reducing births nine months later.”

— Institute for Family Studies

With the postponement of entertainment and sports events, people have been finding innovative ways to still have a good time, despite being indoors. This has led many to deduce that some couples will opt for cuddle time or ‘Netflix and Chill’, which will result in these ‘Coronials’ in the upcoming months.

Nine months later

While some people swear by this, the Institute for Family Studies (IFS) says history has shown that “high-mortality events as diverse as famines, earthquakes, heatwaves, and disease all have very predictable effects on reducing births nine months later.”

An ongoing tally by Johns Hopkins University has recorded more than 350,000 reported cases of the coronavirus worldwide, with more than 15,000 deaths.

The IFS pointed to events such as the influenza outbreaks in France in 1889 and the United States from 1918 to 1920, where there was an increase in deaths but a decrease in births nine months later. This also rings true according to their study of the 2014 Ebola outbreaks in West Africa’s Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, where births decreased despite 11,325 deaths over two years.

This prediction is also not linear, as the IFS says it is common for fertility to rebound after such loss. The United States could see a boost in births by up to 40 per cent over four years after the coronavirus epidemic runs its course.

BUZZ fam, will you be contributing to the supposed ‘Coronial’ generation?

For some, only time will tell.