PSOJ boss says Jamaica must stand on 3 essential pillars

PSOJ boss Howard Mitchell has declared that Jamaica must stand on three pillars, namely corruption must be controlled, secondly the community must be educated and skilled, and its private sector must be innovative, capitalised and well regulated.

Mitchell who has long called for a re-examination of how Jamaica functions said in an address made before private sector and government operatives, that every successful and progressive society stands on three pillars — three foundation stones — the state, the community and the market (commerce).

Howard Mitchell, President of the Private Sector Organisation Of Jamaica (PSOJ)

He said: “If those pillars are not properly balanced and proportional to each other the progress of the society will be threatened.

“For a society to be successful, firstly the state must be strong, effective, facilitative and corruption must be controlled.

“Secondly the community must be educated and skilled, united in common goals and the degree of marginalisation and inequality must not be so great as to be an insurmountable barrier to the success of the average citizen with ambition and drive.

“And finally the market [private sector] must be innovative, agile, well capitalised, technically competent and well regulated.”

Every successful and progressive society stands on three pillars: the state, the community and the market (commerce).

Mitchell made it clear that if these elements are not present, there is a great potential for social disorder, individualistic and selfish behaviour, corruption and antisocial activity.

For almost 6 decades since Jamaica’s independence these pillars have been unbalanced, Mitchell noted.

“If those pillars are not properly balanced and proportional to each other the progress of the society will be threatened.”

“There is no question in my mind that the near-catastrophic failure of our economy up to the last decade is a consequence of the imbalance here described and it would be worth our while to effect a study of our economic history to elicit detailed lessons so as to prevent a repetition in the future,” Mitchell said.